100% Pure Beeswax Candles from Beverly Bees
100% Pure Beeswax Candles from Beverly Bees

Pure Beeswax Candles Handmade in Beverly

Our 100% Beeswax Candles Are Handmade in Beverly, Massachusetts

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Every one of our 100% pure beeswax candles are handmade by us in Beverly, Massachusetts at our honey bee sanctuary and bee farm.  We take great care to ensure every candle is made form the highest quality beeswax and craftsmanship providing you with a high end candle to enjoy in your home. Beeswax is a sustainable resource made by bees from wax they no longer need or use. We use only the highest quality beeswax to make each and every candle. Purchasing a candle from us helps support our bee rescue efforts. When we are not making candles we are saving  and rehabilitating  bee hives, maintaining them in pesticide free locations across Massachusetts. Your purchase helps us sustain these efforts. So thank you for helping us save bees! 

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100% pure beeswax candles are the healthiest candle you can burn. Unlike other candles which pollute the air beeswax naturally purifies the air as it burns. It releases negative ions which bind to toxins in the air making the candle great for anyone with allergies or asthma or unable to use scented candles. Our candles have no scents or color added to them. The variations of yellow color are the natural colors of high quality beeswax and the sweet honey aroma that the beeswax emits is put there by the bees that make the wax. Our candles come in varying shades of yellow. Just like honey comes in different colors depending on the plants that bees forage on, high quality beeswax also varies in shades depending what the bees store in it. 

Beeswax candles are the best candle you can buy in our opinion. They are the slowest burning candle. Our tealights burn for 4 hours each, our votives for 18 hours and our 9 inch pillar burns over 200 hours. This makes them a great economical choice for the health conscious candle lover.  Beeswax drips less than other types of candles and does not smoke when it burns. Simply light the candle and enjoy it’s gentle ambience and sweet honey aroma!

Candle Burning Tips

To get the most from your beeswax candle follow these burning tips –

Before lighting your candle, trim the wick to 1/4  – 1/2 inch.
When lighting you candle tilt candle slightly to ignite the wick.
To help your candle burn evenly to the end allow the candle to burn until the molten pool of wax reaches 1/4 inch to the edge of the candle.

The wick should maintain a 1⁄4 -1/2 inch length while it is burning,  If the wick gets too long , the flame may start to spike and the wick may smoke which adds soot to the air. If you trim the wick too short the candle may have trouble lighting and you may have to melt some of the beeswax around the wick using flame and pour out the molten wax out to allow the wick enough length to light properly. A draft in the room can also cause the flame to flicker and spike.

As the candle burns, the larger diameter, 3 inch candles may require a wick trim occasionally. You may trim the wick while the candle is burning by clipping the wick from the flame using scissors. Immediately extinguish the excess wick in water. Or you could roll the inner edges of the candle top in towards the melted wax pool. As the rolled edges melt this will raise up the molten pool making the wick shorter. You could also add small leftover pieces of wax to the molten pool to bring it higher around the wick. You can use leftover beeswax candle bits.

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Beeswax burns hotter then other waxes. Do not burn pillar candles in enclosed containers. Rather burn your pillar candle on an open heat resistant platter enabling the candle to receive the adequate oxygen it requires to burn properly.

It’s important the candle is sitting on a flat surface when burning otherwise it will begin to run over. Once this happens the life of the candle is significantly shortened and it is difficult to burn successfully after that.

Situate burning candles at least 8 inches apart and away from drafts. Maintain a quality burn by not burning candles too closely grouped together. Otherwise, the sides of the neighbouring candles will begin to soften, eventually melting through from the hot temperature of it’s own molten pool of wax. This could cause potential damage to surfaces and shorten the life of the candle.

Never blow out your candle flame. The thick cotton wicking will keep smouldering and fill the air with smoke. To extinguish the candle flame, dunk the burning wick into the molten wax pool using a wick dipper, then straighten upright.

The wick is now primed and ready for the next burn.

TAPER CANDLES
Burn taper candles in a draft free room. Never blow out your candle flames. You risk spraying the hot wax across surfaces. Instead, use a snuffer or a candle wick dipper to extinguish, then place a drop of melted wax on the wick to stop smoldering.

VOTIVE CANDLES
Burn votive candles free of drafts on a heat resistant platter or in containers with open sides. Basically, you want to use a container with a larger opening then traditional votive size candle holders. By using larger containers it allows the candle to receive the adequate oxygen it requires to burn properly. Restricted airflow will cause the flame to waver to and from resulting in inefficient combustion. Not only will this shorten the burn time, the flame will begin to smoke and add soot to the air. To extinguish candle flame, dunk wick in molten pool using a wick dipper, then straighten upright.

TEALIGHT CANDLES
Burn tealights in a room free of drafts in quality tealight cups on a heat resistant surface. Tealights burn best in containers that do not restrict the air flow. To extinguish candle flame, dunk wick in molten pool using a wick dipper, then straighten upright.

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Author: Anita Deeley

Anita Deeley is a biologist and former state bee inspector who maintains 100 honey bee hives. She is the beekeeper, writer, owner and creator of BeverlyBees.com. When she is not spending time with her girls (the bees), she enjoys being a wife to her beekeeping cohort, Brian and mother to 3 little boys (the beekeepers in training). Read more about Anita here >> -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Connect with Anita on Twitter, Pinterest, Google+ or Facebook here.

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